Sizzix Die Lot Alphabet RARE Set Font DieCut Brand NEW IN BOX Alphabars Ransom

Sizzix Die Lot Alphabet RARE Set Font DieCut  Brand NEW IN BOX Alphabars Ransom

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eBay This is a 27 total shape set Complete Ransom note  Style Font Alphabet Lot with upper case, lower case. I cut out examples to show you. In another listing I have the numbers set that matches this as well. .  This lot is hard to find and RETIRED. The font is called Ransom and the style of dies are called alphabars.  They work perfectly!  In brand new perfect condition. I literally just for this box brand new from someone who had old stock and I bought it not knowing that I already had this exact same alphabet don't already!! Even if it were used, You'd never know they were used actually because no matter which die-cutting machine or embossing machine you use for these dies they are so thick they never bend or warp so they are always in perfect condition even after use. We still have these dies and use them all the time, these are just duplicates, which is why I am selling. They are retired and no long made anymore. so, this makes them more valuable all the time, feel free to make me an offer since I am not really sure what they are worth. They are made by Sizzix so one would assume are meant to be used in the Sizzix Big Kick or Big shot die cutting machine. But I have used these in my cuttlebug as well as my  fiskars fuse. There are several videos on YouTube that show you how to use these in these machines. I'm sure they can be used in the Spellbinders grand caliber too. I am only selling because I recently acquired some duplicates and so I still have these in my personal collection of cool stuff to scrapbook with, these are just duplicates here. These Bigz Original Sizzix Dies are called STEEL RULE DIES, and so that means that they cut through an AMAZING amount of materials included, but not limited to: paper, cardboard, card stock, wood, metals, felt, material, burlap, magnet sheeting, clear acetate sheets, vinyl, adhesive vinyl, cork-board, plastic, fabrics, glitter card stock, aluminum, GrungeBoard (the stuff by Tim Holtz ), Chipboard, suede paper, Kid's Fun Foam, leather paper and shrinky dinks - So that is all that I have PERSONALLY cut with these dies, BUT there are a total of 50 different materials that Sizzix Claims that these steel rule dies can cut. here is that list: Here’s a list of 50 approved materials that the Sizzix BigShot/BigKick can cut with a ALL STEEL RULE DIES such as, Bigz dies, Bigz Extended Dies, Originals, Sizzix Pro Dies, and Movers & Shapers Dies: (note the maximum thickness of several materials) * Brass (.055) * Light weight steel * Aluminum (.016) * Tin (.008) * Aircraft plywood (1/64") * Basswood (1/16") * Balsa (3/32") * Paperwood * Mat board (adhesive or none) * Chipboard * Fabric * Silicone * Foam with chipboard (.1) * Corrugated pad * Adhesive-backed cork * Fine sandpaper (.00) * Styrene * Extra thick template plastic * Template plastic * Plastic canvas (7 mesh) * Bubble wrap * Sheet foam * Friendly (jewelry) plastic * 100% pure beeswax (cut with parchment paper on top & bottom of beeswax) * Adhesive and non-adhesive rubber * Ruffleboard * Static cling vinyl * Warm & natural batting * Fusible fleece * Quilt batting * Adhesive and non-adhesive flexible magnet * Heat n’ shrink plastic * Adhesive and non-adhesive felt * Pop-up sponge * Shiny self-adhesive and non-adhesive paper * Iron-on fabric * Poly foam adhesive and non adhesive * 3-D illusionary plastic * Glow in the dark adhesive and non adhesive * Suede paper * Funky fur * Personal Embossing Plastic (PEP) * Shaggy plush felt * Canvas * Vinyl flooring * Shelf lining * Placemats * Embossing rubber * Thin leather * Gasket material   If you need to know anything, Just ask.  Ask me any questions you may have. I have included the last photo in this listing to show the variety of crafts supplies that I have for sale currently that I will be listing like crazy for the next week or so.  If I see some other crafting items that I feel would happily go along with this one that is currently listed, I will just quickly take a group pick of the other cool things that I think you may also enjoy. But to be clear THIS LISTING IS FOR THE ONE LOT or SET ~ the LOT that is IN THE FIRST PHOTOS. The images that show examples of cards are just to show what you COULD do with your set, these cards are not included, nor would I even be creative enough to probably even figure out how to make those cards :) Scrapbooking is a method for preserving personal and family history in the form of a scrapbook. Typical memorabilia include photographs, printed media, and artwork. Scrapbook albums are often decorated and frequently contain extensive journaling. Scrapbooking is a hobby commonly practiced in many parts of world. Contents 1 History 2 Friendship scrapbook example from approximately 1795 to 1834 3 Modern scrapbooking 4 Scrapbooking media 4.1 Scrapbooking materials 4.2 Digital scrapbooking 5 Scrapbooking industry statistics 6 Common scrapbooking idioms 6.1 Journaling 6.2 Sketches 7 See also 8 References 9 External links History In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them. A page from a Smith College student’s scrapbook circa 1906. This page uses drawings, ephemera, and physical objects to represent a day in the life of the student. For example, college women around the turn of the century used scrapbooks extensively to construct representations of their everyday life as students. Without photograph albums to provide images of these life events, students created unique representations through scrapbooks in order to illustrate their lives using ephemera and memorabilia. A guest list or group of visiting cards might represent a young woman’s visit to a party. A playbill and ticket stub might serve as reminders of a trip to New York to see a Broadway show. Solid objects such as plants, silverware, or small trinkets were also used when further visual representation was needed. A page from these subject-based scrapbooks might include class schedules, exam booklets, letters from professors, or other printed material from school events. Thus scrapbooks from this era can create a more complete image of their maker’s life. [5] During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks. [5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing. [6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years. The advent of modern photography began with the first permanent photograph created by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826.[7] This allowed the average person to begin to incorporate photographs into their scrapbooks. However, books or albums made specifically for showcasing photographs alone were not popularized in the United States until closer to 1860. Before that point, photographs were not thought of as items to be reproduced and shared. Demand for photo albums was spurred on in large part by the growing popularity of the carte de visite, a small photograph distributed in the same manner one might a visiting card.[6] A page from a photograph album circa 1906. The pages and color of this album are made especially for displaying photographs. The album’s owner has arranged her photographs in order to represent her college campus and president. Old scrapbooks tended to have photos mounted with photomounting corners and perhaps notations of who was in a photo or where and when it was taken. They often included bits of memorabilia like newspaper clippings, letters, etc. An early known American scrapbooker and inventor of scrapbooking supplies was Mark Twain also known as Samuel Clemmens. Twain was known to carry scrapbooks on his travels as he collected souvenirs, clippings and pictures.[8][9][10] Friendship scrapbook example from approximately 1795 to 1834 The following photographs show some of the pages from a "Memorial of Friendship" scrapbook kept by Anne Wagner, a British woman, between 1795 and 1834. She belonged to the same social circle as the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. Anne Wagner's scrapbook includes pages she created, as well as contributions from friends and relatives. The scrapbook contains handwritten poems, notes left by friends and relatives, and decoupage ephemera like locks of hair, decorative paper clippings, ribbons, and detailed watercolour sketches. The verso side of the cover page of Anne Wagner's scrapbook. An elaborate example of a braided hairlock attached to a page. The inscription is from Elizabeth Venables; the location is given as Abergale, July 29, 1803. This poem was handwritten for Anne Wagner by her brother, G.W. Wagner, August 13, 1795. This page of Anne Wagner's scrapbook was created by her niece, Felicia, aged 12. A page from the scrapbook that is devoted to Anne Wagner's friend, the Right Honourable Viscountess Kirkwall, Anna Kirkwall. A watercolour background is used for this collage page that includes decorative gilded paper cutouts. A page devoted to Mrs. Browne of Gwrych. A silhouette portrait attached to a page as a memento of someone, with a handwritten poem beneath. A page titled "Sappho" with the name of Anne Wagner's niece, Felicia. Watercolour sketches of found objects, including a butterfly, a feather and seashells. Modern scrapbooking Play media This video is an example of how to create a page for the new and modern day scrapbooker. Marielen W. Christensen (pronounced as the names "Mary Ellen"), of Elk Ridge, Utah, United States (formerly of Spanish Fork, Utah) is credited with turning scrapbooking from what was once just the age-old scrapbook hobby into the actual industry containing businesses devoted specifically to the sale and manufacturing of scrapbooking supplies. She began designing creative pages for her family's photo memories, inserting the completed pages into sheet protectors collected in 3-ring binders. By 1980, she had assembled over fifty volumes and was invited to display them at the World Conference on Records in Salt Lake City. Marielen and her husband A.J. authored and published a how-to book, Keeping Memories Alive, and opened a scrapbook store in Spanish Fork in 1981 that remains open today.[11][12] A digital scrapbook layout showing a varied use of photographs In addition to preserving memories, the hobby is popular for the strong social network that scrapbooking can provide.[13] Hobbyists, known as "scrappers" or "scrapbookers," get together and scrapbook at each other's homes, local scrapbook stores,[14] scrapbooking conventions, retreat centers, and even on cruises.[15] The attendees share tips and ideas as well as enjoying a social outlet. The term "crop," a reference to cropping or trimming printed photographs, was coined to describe these events.[16] Following the lead of Keeping Memories Alive (in a smaller building next door and named The Annex in its early years), many other stores have popped up and cater to the scrapbooking community. These shops provide many of the necessary tools for every scrapbooker's needs. Besides Keeping Memories Alive, these include companies such as Creative Memories, Making Memories, Stampin' Up!, and Close to My Heart. The scrapbooking industry doubled in size between 2001 and 2004 to $2.5 billion[17] with over 1,600 companies creating scrapbooking products by 2003. Creative Memories, a home-based retailer of scrapbooking supplies founded in 1987, saw $425 million in retail sales in 2004.[18] Creative Memories parent company did file Chapter 11 in 2013 and became the bankruptcy with the largest debt in the Twin City area.[19] According to Google Trends, the search terms related to scrapbook and scrapbooking have seen a 70 percent decline since its peak in 2005-2006.[20] However, there is much debate among the community of people who engage in memory keeping about what the decline means for the health and future of the industry as a whole. What seems to be clear is that traditional scrapbooking is once again in a transition period due to many forces including current economic issues, the influence of social media and the ease of digital sharing, and the rejection of the stereotype of traditional scrapbooks being something that is for older women. However, if one takes a closer look, it is easy to see all the ways people continue memory keeping even if it doesn't fall strictly within the definition of traditional scrapbooking as defined here. Some examples include the advent of Smash books created by EK Success, which in some ways, are a closer representation to original scrapbooks in that they are wire bound books in a variety of sizes consisting of blank printed background papers into which one can journal and glue mementos into.[21] Another current variation enjoying a surge in popularity is the introduction and growth of pocket scrapbooking, most well known and represented by Project Life created and introduced by Becky Higgins. Higgins created the system in response to her personal desire to continue record the lives of her children and family, but in a quicker, more simple way that allowed her the flexibility to complete the project, but still in an attractive, cohesive way.[22] Scrapbooking media Scrapbooking materials An example of a digital scrapbook kit The most important scrapbooking supply is the album itself, which can be permanently bound, or allow for the insertion of pages. There are other formats such as mini albums and accordion-style fold-out albums. Some of these are adhered to various containers, such as matchbooks, CD cases, or other small holders. When scrap artists started moving away from the "page" and onto alternative surfaces and objectives, they termed these creations "altered items" or now simply called "off-the-page". This movement circles back to the history of art from the 1960s when Louise Nevelson was doing "Assemblages" with found objects and recycled parts. Modern scrapbooking is done largely on 12 inch (30 cm) square or letter-size (US Letter (8.5 by 11 inch) or A4 (210 by 297 mm)) pages. More recently, smaller albums have become popular. The most common new formats are 6, 7, or 8-inch (15, 17.5, or 20 cm) square. It is important to many scrappers to protect their pages with clear page protectors. Basic materials include background papers (including printed and cardstock paper), photo corner mounts (or other means of mounting photos such as adhesive dots, photo mounting tape, or acid-free glue), scissors, a paper trimmer or cutting tool, art pens, archival pens for journaling, and mounting glues (like thermo-tac). More elaborate designs require more specialized tools such as die cut templates, rubber stamps, craft punches, stencils, inking tools, eyelet setters, heat embossing tools and personal die cut machines. A lot of time people who enjoy scrapbooking will create their own background papers by using the tools mentioned along with "fancy" textured scissors. Various accessories, referred to as "embellishments", are used to decorate scrapbook pages. Embellishments include stickers, rub-ons, stamps, eyelets, brads, chipboard elements in various shapes, alphabet letters, lace, wire, fabric, beads, sequins, and ribbon. The use of die cut machines is also increasingly popular; in recent years a number of electronic die-cutting machines resembling a plotter with a drag knife have hit the market (e.g. The Cricut), enabling scrappers to use their computer to create die cuts out of any shape or font with the use of free or third party software. Scrapbook makers will also use magazine clippings to "decorate" a scrapbook. One of the key components of modern scrapbooking is the archival quality of the supplies. Designed to preserve photographs and journaling in their original state, materials encouraged by most serious scrapbookers are of a higher quality than those of many typical photo albums commercially available. Scrappers insist on acid-free, lignin-free papers, stamp ink, and embossing powder. They also use pigment-based inks, which are fade resistant, colorfast, and often waterproof. Many scrappers use buffered paper, which will protect photos from acid in memorabilia used in the scrapbook. Older "magnetic" albums are not acid-free and thus cause damage to the photos and memorabilia included in them. Gloves, too, are used to protect photos from the oil on hands.[23] An international standard, ISO 18902, provides specific guidelines on materials that are safe for scrapbooking through its requirements for albums, framing, and storage materials. ISO 18902 includes requirements for photo-safety and a specific pH range for acid-free materials. ISO 18902 prohibits the use of harmful materials, including Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and Cellulose nitrate. Digital scrapbooking The advent of scanners, desktop publishing, page layout programs, and advanced printing options make it relatively easy to create professional-looking layouts in digital form. The internet allows scrapbookers to self-publish their work. Scrapbooks that exist completely in digital image form are referred to as "digital scrapbooks" or "computer scrapbooks."[24] A digital scrapbook layout that demonstrates the use of numerous digital "materials" While some people prefer the physicality of the actual artifacts they paste onto the pages of books, the digital scrapbooking hobby has grown in popularity in recent years.[25] Some of the advantages include a greater diversity of materials, less environmental impact, cost savings, the ability to share finished pages more readily on the internet, and the use of image editing software to experiment with manipulating page elements in multiple ways without making permanent adjustments.[26] A traditional scrapbook layout may employ a background paper with a torn edge. While a physical page can only be torn once and never restored, a digital paper can be torn and untorn with ease, allowing the scrapbooker to try out different looks without wasting supplies. Some web-based digital scrapbooks include a variety of wallpapers and backgrounds to help the users create a rich visual experience. Each paper, photo, or embellishment exists on its own layer in your document, and you can reposition them at your discretion.[27] Furthermore, digital scrapbooking is not limited to digital storage and display. Many digital scrappers print their finished layouts to be stored in scrapbook albums. Others have books professionally printed in hard bound books to be saved as keepsakes. Professional printing- and binding-services offer free software to create scrapbooks with professional layouts and individual layout capabilities. Because of the integrated design and order workflow, real hardcover bound books can be produced more cost effectively. Early digital scrapbooks were created from digital photos uploaded to an external site. Over time, this moved to a model of downloading software onto a personal computer that will organize photos and help create the digital scrapbook. With the growth of Web 2.0 functionality, digital scrapbooking is going back online, to avoid the hassles of having to download and install PC software. The availability of cheap online storage (e.g., on Amazon's S3 service), and the desire to leverage pre-uploaded online albums (e.g., on Yahoo's Flickr) make it more convenient for users to directly compose their digital scrapbooks online. Print on demand fulfillment enables such digital scrapbooks to effectively supplant traditional scrapbooks. Digital scrapbooking has advanced to the point where digital scrapbook layouts may be made entirely online using Web-based software. Users upload their photos, create a digital scrapbook layout using a Web page and digital scrapbook graphics. The layout can then be downloaded as a low-resolution JPEG file for sharing on the Web or as a high-resolution JPEG file for printing. Scrapbooking industry statistics Some people attribute the increased interest in scrapbooking to a renewed passion for genealogy, while others say that it is an outlet for those interested in photography and graphic design. For evidence of interest in scrapbooking, consider the following facts:[citation needed] Over 4 million women in the United States alone consider themselves to be scrapbookers.[citation needed] Over 4% of all women in U.S. have done traditional scrapbooking. Millions of others do various aspects of photo books but are not scrapbookers.[citation needed] Scrapbooking is one of the largest categories within the craft and hobby industry and now considered[by whom?] to be the third most popular craft in the nation. From 1996 through 2004, sales of scrapbooking products increased across the United States. In 2005, annual sales flattened for the first time after many back to back years of double growth. From 2006 through 2010 traditional scrapbooking sales have declined, while digital forms of scrapbooking have grown. Traditional scrapbooking sales for 2010 have declined to about $1.6 billion in annual sales from a peak of about $2.5 billion in 2005.[28] During that same time frame the number of independent scrapbooking stores declined from a high of 4,200 to about 1,200 independent storefronts. The number of scrapbooking manufacturers also declined in that same period from a high of 800 to under 250[citation needed]. Common scrapbooking idioms Journaling In addition to the collection of photographs, tickets, postcards, and other memorabilia, journaling is often a principal element in modern scrapbooks. Journaling is text that describes, explains, or accents the photographs on a scrapbook page. Contemporary journaling can take many forms. It can be reflective and story-like, take a reportive tone, or simply be a list of words. Journaling may also include song lyrics, quotations, and poems. The value of journaling lies in the fact that it provides an account of family histories that may otherwise not be preserved. Many consider journaling one of the most important elements of any scrapbook.[29] Journaling is a personal choice and it can describe the event, the photographs, or relate feelings and emotions. Handwritten journaling is considered best by some scrapbookers who see handwriting as valuable for posterity, but many people journal on the computer and print it onto a variety of surfaces including vellum, tape, ribbon, and paper. Sketches Scrapbookers will sometimes refer to sketches for inspiration for their pages.[citation needed] Sketches are a hand-drawn layout showing where to position photos, titles, journaling and embellishments. It gives novice scrapbookers somewhere to begin if they are not experienced with balancing the layout correctly. Scrapbookers can interpret the sketch in any way they choose; it is a great starting point when you have scrappers-block. There have been many sketchbooks published and scrapbooking magazines always offer sketches as part of their content.[original research?] Paper embossing From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia For embossing metal, see Repoussé and chasing. This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (April 2008) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Embossed paper seal An embossed postcard, Carnegie Library, Houston, Texas (circa 1900-1924). A debossed map of the British Isles, from William Moon's Light for the Blind, published in 1877. Hand-operated embossing machine Embossing and debossing are the processes of creating either raised or recessed relief images and designs in paper and other materials. An embossed pattern is raised against the background, while a debossed pattern is sunken into the surface of the material (but might protrude somewhat on the reverse, back side). Contents 1 Techniques 2 Die materials 3 Embossing types 3.1 Blind emboss 3.2 Registered emboss 3.3 Combination emboss 3.4 Pastelling 3.5 Glazing 3.6 Scorching 4 Document authentication 5 On stamps 6 See also 7 References and sources Techniques Often used in combination with foil stamping, embossing alters the surface of paper stock or other substrates by providing a three-dimensional or raised effect on selected areas. The procedure requires the use of two dies: one that is raised and one that is recessed. The dies fit into each other so that when the paper is pressed between them, the raised die forces the stock into the recessed die and creates the embossed impression. A specific level of pressure is applied to the dies in order to squeeze the fibers of the paper, which results in a permanently raised area in the paper.When the dies are produced, a die maker engraves the desired image into several metal plates, which are the embossing dies for use on an embossing press. A thorough understanding the process will enable a more successful result. Generally, embossing is the process most often employed to attract attention or convey a high quality textural contrast in relation to the surrounding area of the paper stock. "Debossing" is similar to embossing, but recesses the design rather than raising it. Rather than the paper being raised in specific areas, it is indented. The process involves applying pressure to the front side of a substrate and forcing the material down from the surface. Although it is not as common as embossing, it is occasionally used to provide a different effect or appearance that fits a particular theme. Embossing and debossing on digitally printed applications is an off-line process, which may add a significant cost to the job. Embossing is basically used to create a distinctive effect. The greatest concern and emphasis on the client's behalf should be placed on the outcome of the embossed effect. In order to achieve the best possible effect, it is important to understand the embossing process and the types of dies that are used for embossing.The three factors that need to be controlled during the embossing process are: 1. Pressure: the intensity of the impact on the weight of the stock being embossed. 2. Heat: the ability to maintain a consistent heat level for the best impression. 3. Die depth: the client's artwork or the engraver's efforts will initially determine the die depth, however, if by looking at the artwork it appears that an adjustment of the die depth may be necessary, the die may need to be retooled to achieve a greater depth. Most types of paper can be embossed, and size is not normally a consideration. Embossing without ink, so that the image is raised but not colored, is called "blind embossing." Embossing used in conjunction with ink, so that the raised area is colored, is called "color register embossing." Embossing used in conjunction with foil stamping is called "combination stamping" or "combo stamping." Embossing involves a separate stage in the production process, after any varnishing and laminating. It requires a separate press run, and is priced accordingly. In addition to being used as a design element, embossing can be used to improve the performance of paper products like napkins, diapers, and tissue paper. Die materials The metals most often used for die construction are zinc, magnesium, copper, and brass. The material used for a specific application depends upon a number of factors. Embossing types Blind emboss Blind embossing does not include the use of ink or foil to highlight the embossed area. The change in the dimensional appearance of the material is the only noticeable difference resulting from the embossing. The blind embossing process provides a clean and distinctive or subtle image on paper stock. It is best used to create a subtle impression or low level of attention to the piece, yet provide some slight form of differentiation for the finished work. Registered emboss Registered embossing is a process that places the embossed image in alignment with another element created with ink, foil, punching, or with a second embossed image. Embossed in register (EIR) simulates the natural appearance of hardwood flooring by adding depth and texture in alignment with a print on the material.[1] Combination emboss Combination embossing is the process of embossing and foil stamping the same image. It involves imprinting and aligning foil over an embossed image to create a foil emboss. A sculptured die, generally made of brass is used for this procedure. The process requires close registration that must be controlled to keep the image and foil matched precisely. The process of embossing and foil stamping is accomplished in one operation with the use of a combination die. The combination die has a cutting edge around the perimeter to cleanly break the excess foil away from the embossed area. Pastelling Pastelling is also referred to as tint leaf embossing. It involves the process of using a combination die to provide a subtle antique appearance to a substrate that is embossed and foil stamped. Pearl finishes, clear gloss, or similar pastel foil finishes can be selected that provide a soft two-color antique look (without scorching) to the embossed image. Lighter colored stocks work best to provide this soft contrasting effect. Glazing Glazing refers to an embossed area that has a shiny or polished appearance. Most often this process is accomplished with heat that is applied with pressure in order to create a shiny impression on the stock. Dark colored heavy weight stocks generally work best with glazing because the polished effect is much more noticeable and the dark color of the stock helps to eliminate or soften any burned appearance that may result from the application of the heat. When used in conjunction with foil, the process can provide the foil with a slightly brighter appearance. Scorching Scorching is similar to glazing except that it is not used to polish the stock. Instead, scorching does what it implies: as the temperature of the die heating plate is increased beyond a normal temperature range, a scorched effect is created in the embossed image, which results in an antique or shaded appearance. It is best to use a lighter colored stock for this procedure in order to provide a unique two-toned appearance. Caution should be used in requesting this effect, since it is easy to burn the stock if too much heat is used. If scorching occurs too close to the printed copy, it can interfere with the clarity of the printed copy; however, this may be the effect that is desired for a particular application. Document authentication A notary public may use an embossed seal to mark legal papers, either in the form of an adhesive seal, or using a clamp-like embossing device, to certify a signature on a document, contract, etc., or cause to become certified through a notary public or bill. Registered professional engineers also use embossing seals to certify drawings, thereby guaranteeing to the recipient that due diligence has been exercised in the design. On stamps Embossing on an 1886 revenue stamp of Great Britain. Embossing has been used regularly on postage and other types of stamps. The embossed paper of a letter sheet or stamped envelope is called an indicium. Notable early examples include some of the earliest stamps of Italy, Natal, and Switzerland, as well as the early high values of Great Britain (1847–54).[2] Modern stamps still sometimes use embossing as a design element.u Sizzix From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Sizzix is the brand name of a product range of home die-cutting machines and embossing solutions manufactured by Ellison.[1] The machines are used for cutting materials such as paper, fabric, vellum, metal and other materials that scissors can cut.[2] The products are most commonly used by crafters, quilters and sewers for scrapbooking, cardmaking, home décor, jewelry making, and other arts and crafts activities.[3] Sizzix has also seen success in its partnership with about 20 artists who have opened the company up to new markets and categories. Artists include the Tim Holtz, known for his distressed inks and vintage-grunge style; Susan Tierney-Cockburn, famous for her elaborate floral papercrafting designs; and Jo Packham, who has a new line to package food and embellish jars and other edible gifts. [4] Machines The Sizzix product range launched in 2001 as an evolution of the first patented die-cutting machine, the Ellison LetterMachine, created in 1977.[5] The Big Shot, BIGkick , and Big Shot Pro are among the hand-operated die-cutting machines. The eclips and "eclips2" is the brand's electronic shape-cutting machine and utilizes designs stored on cartridges. Along with the die-cutting machines, the Sizzix product range also includes steel-rule dies, chemically-etched dies, embossing folders and storage solutions.[6] Awards The Golden Press Kit Award was awarded to Sizzix at the Craft and Hobby Association (CHA) Summer 2012 trade show.[7] The BIGkick was awarded the 2008 Reader's Choice Winner in the February 2009 issue of Creating Keepsakes magazine in the Die Cut Equipment category. [8]

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GRANDCO ~ Black & Marble Embellished Flip Flop Thongs Sz 10 * VERY GOOD COND.

$11.94


End Date: Tuesday Jul-31-2018 23:22:09 PDT
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Barbie Tagged Outfit Fashion Clothes Lot 6 pieces Tops & Bottoms Teal Blue

$4.00


End Date: Friday Aug-3-2018 19:48:41 PDT
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MontBlanc Meisterstuck Black & Gold Classique Ballpoint Pen -Working w/ Blue Ink

$129.99


End Date: Sunday Jul-29-2018 12:16:17 PDT
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set of 2 - Z71 4x4 Chevy Silverado 07-13 Decals Stickers Fade Red Apple GRRDAPL

$17.22


End Date: Sunday Jul-29-2018 14:22:19 PDT
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MINT1880s BROOKS MAINE Rodolf's NEW MEDICAL DISCOVERY Big Paneled Aqua SlugPlate

$4.20

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End Date: Wednesday Aug-1-2018 18:30:16 PDT
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Vintage Electro-Harmonix Tall Font Big Muff Pi | Guitar Pedal Sovtek Fuzz

$351.99


End Date: Tuesday Aug-14-2018 15:24:36 PDT
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2 VTG 1920s Atlas E-Z Seal Wire Bail Qt & Pt Aqua Blue Canning Jars w/Glass Lids

$33.00


End Date: Thursday Aug-9-2018 19:48:55 PDT
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